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2022 Legion Memorial Run N Gun: Sept 10-11, Spencer, TN

Invictus77

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I'm not saying this derogatorily, but you could walk the damn thing and still not come in last if your shooting is half decent. and even if you came in dead last, at least you showed up.

For me, most of these things are 12+hours drive so I'm a little selective. If RnG was a regular thing within 4-5 hours, I'd do a lot more. I don't go to compete against others, just myself. Im not in the shape I was 5-7 years ago, but I'm doing OK for becoming an old guy lol. Beer has become my arch nemesis.

If it is relatively close, the only reason not to be there is you didn't get in, and then you can get on the waitlist. Honestly, if this was only a 2 hour drive or so for me, I'd go to this match just to be there even if I couldn't run it.
I agree 100% and I may show up just to socialize if nothing else if I can. September is a tough month for me however.

We always have a big family party here on Labor Day weekend. For work every year, I put on a 5-day Mining Electrical Engineering seminar for customers, which starts two Mondays after Labor Day. I teach several of the EE segments myself, but I am also the MC and coordinate the entire event. The week before the EE school requires lots of final prep, plus I'm still trying to accomplish my regular "day job" while that all happens. On a purely personal note, September is also dove season here 😁

Adding other commitments to September is a challenge.
 

kotengu

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Stage 3 (5k) or 5 (10k): SGM Michael B. Stack

In this stage: React to a convoy attack near Baghdad, Iraq. Assault the enemy position, evacuate casualties, and reinforce your position before a counterattack.



Silver Star: Awarded For Actions During Global War on Terror
https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/29117

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Major Michael Boyd Stack, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Company Sergeant Major with Company C, 2d Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, near Baghdad, Iraq, on 11 April 2004. On that date, Sergeant Major Sack's Special Forces team was traveling from Baghdad to Al Hillah, Iraq, when they came under enemy fire. His vehicle was pulling rear security for the convoy and Sergeant Major Stack immediately began to fire upon the enemy so that the others in the kill zone could escape from the hail of enemy fire. He then led a security force into the kill zone to eliminate the remaining threat and allow for the safe evacuation of casualties. After the casualties were evacuated, Sergeant Major Stack began preparation for a counterattack on the enemy position. He manned a .50 caliber machine gun to cover the elements movement toward the enemy position but, because of a damaged vehicle, the counterattack was abandoned, so Sergeant Major Stack directed a link-up with a nearby quick reaction Force and returned to Forward Operation Base 52 to refit. Knowing that the element was in danger of being attacked, he began leading the soldiers in reinforcing their position. That night, as their convoy moved toward Al Hillah, the Special Forces element was ambushed several times from several directions by a high volume of enemy fire in a multiple-kilometer kill zone. In the midst of the ambush, Sergeant Major Stack remained calm and continued to direct fire upon the enemy while keeping control of his element and allowing other vehicles to maneuver to covered and concealed positions. After seeing Sergeant Major Stack's actions, which helped to lead the Special Forces element out of the kill zone, the enemy began to concentrate fire on his vehicle. An explosion killed him instantly. Sergeant Major Stack's personal sacrifice and courage allowed the remainder of the attack t fight its way out of the ambush and ultimately, to survive the attack. His intrepid actions, at the cost of his life, exemplified the highest traditions of the military forces and reflects great credit upon himself, the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), and the United States Army.
 

kotengu

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Stage 4 (5k) or 6 (10k): SFC Nathan Chapman

In this stage: As you approach a checkpoint in Khost, Afghanistan, react to the attack that mortally wounded SFC Chapman. Eliminate the enemy, avenge SFC Chapman, and gather intel about bin Laden and Taliban commander Jalaluddin Haqqani’s location in the mountains outside of town, then radio it in to HQ. (18E – Communications SGT)



Born into a military family, Chapman was born at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland where his father was stationed. He graduated high school from Centerville High School in Ohio and was active with the wrestling team. He immediately joined the Army and went to Ft. Benning for Basic, Advanced Infantry Training and Ranger training before being assigned to the 2nd Ranger Bn at Ft. Lewis, Washington.

In December of 1989, Chapman participated in the invasion of Panama during Operation Just Cause and parachuted into the airfield at Rio Hato, where the Rangers seized the airfield and took down Manuel Noriega’s beach house which had a headquarters in the upper floors.

In 1991, Chapman would once again go into combat during Desert Storm in January 1991. Later that year, he volunteered for Special Forces training and attended SFAS, and the Special Forces Qualification Course at Ft. Bragg, NC. He graduated in December 1992 as an 18E (Communications Sergeant) and then attended the Defense Language Institute’s Tagalog course, finishing in June of 1993.

Chapman was assigned to the 3rd Bn, 1st SFG(A) in July of 1993 and served on ODAs A-185 and A-195. During 1995, he went with his unit to Haiti during Operation Uphold Democracy. In 1998, Chapman was assigned to 1st Bn, 1st SFG(A) on Okinawa and served there for three years. He returned to Ft. Lewis and the 3/1 SFG in 2001.

After 9/11 he volunteered for a special mission in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom. Before he left, he told his wife that his chances of returning were 50/50. They took a family photo and he gave her a heart pendant that they broke so that each could take half.

But after arriving in the country, his odds of surviving got better. The Americans with Northern Alliance allies and massive U.S. air support battered the Taliban and bottled them and al-Qaeda up in Tora Bora including Osama bin Laden.

On the fateful day of January 4, Chapman was with a group of 25 Special Operators, CIA men and their Afghan allies commanded by Zakim Khan Zadran. Team Hotel consisted of three Green Berets, two CIA Paramilitary Officers, and one CIA Contractor. When they arrived in Khost, they were met by Afghans loyal to Padsha Khan Zadran, who, although are unrelated belong to the same clan of Pashtuns who dominate the surrounding area.

In a story that goes back hundreds if not a thousand years, the two warlords were locked in a jealous struggle for power and prestige. With the Taliban on the run, the power vacuum opened the door for old rivalries to take center stage.

Padsha Khan Zadran ordered his men to fire on the Americans at their checkpoint in order to convince American commanders to ditch Zakim Khan Zadran and force their alliance to him. To Chapman and the other Americans, they were searching for information that both bin Laden and Taliban commander Jalaluddin Haqqani were holed up in the mountains outside of town.

After the Americans had met with both warlords they set out to inspect two sites where American airstrikes had hit Taliban targets about 3 miles away. One target, a bombed-out mosque, Chapman conducted bomb assessment damage and then drove to a fort where Taliban tanks had taken a beating from U.S. airstrikes.

As they approached a checkpoint manned by Padsha Khan Zadran’s men, Chapman was standing in the rear of the truck with a camera around his neck. Shots rang out, Chapman slumped in the back of the truck, severely wounded. Before he collapsed, he emptied his M-4 in the direction of the enemy. By the time they got back to where they’d left from just a short time before, he was dead. A CIA Paramilitary Officer from the Special Activities Division was wounded.

The fighters loyal to Zakim Khan Zadran stated the fire came directly from the checkpoint but the other warlord disagreed. He claimed that the firing came from 50 yards away behind a half-finished mosque. He said his men had arrested a 14-year-old boy who claimed that he had fired the shots to avenge the removal of the Taliban and the bombing of the mosque. Conveniently, the boy escaped from confinement two days later and fled to Pakistan.

However, witnesses identified three men who fired the shots as fighters of Padsha Khan Zadran who then also, conveniently, fled to Pakistan.

Chapman’s body was returned to Washington state and he was buried about a week later in Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent, Washington. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart. His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star with “V” device, the Purple Heart, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Achievement Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Humanitarian Service Medal, the United Nations Medal, the Kuwait Liberation Medal, the Southwest Asia Service Medal with Bronze Service Star, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with arrowhead, the Army Good Conduct Medal (3rd Award), the Armed Forces Service Medal, the Joint Meritorious Service Unit Award, the Army Superior Unit Award, the Combat Infantryman Badge second award, the Master Parachutist Badge, the Parachutist Combat Badge with bronze service star, the Special Forces Combat Divers Badge, the Special Forces Tab, the Ranger Tab, and the Royal Thai Army Parachutist Badge.

He left behind his wife Renae and two children a daughter Amanda (2) and a son Brandon (1) who were too young to remember their father.

The CIA honored Chapman in 2015 by unveiling a star on their Memorial Wall in his honor.
https://sofrep.com/specialoperation...chapman-green-beret-cia-kia-afghanistan-2002/
 

kotengu

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I am pleased to announce Timney Triggers is returning this year as an Obstacle sponsor.

I know several people who shoot well with a terrible trigger (looking at you, stimpsonjcat!), but it's so much easier to shoot well with a good trigger. Check out https://timneytriggers.com/ if you want to be one of the latter instead of the former. :)

 

kotengu

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The post everyone has been waiting for: HIT COUNT!

The MINIMUM required hits are as follows:

5k: 50 rifle and 60 pistol
10k: 80 rifle and 60 pistol

The shooting at Legion is always difficult, so I highly suggest NOT skimping on the ammo you carry so you don't run out. I personally will carry 180 rds rifle and 126 rds pistol for the 10k when I run it - and I know exactly what is coming.

Night matches will use the 5k hit count as the MAXIMUM. Ellis may simplify some of the stages once he sees them on the ground if he feels it's necessary - so you MIGHT shoot a little less at night, but you will definitely not shoot more.

And just because I'm a nerd, the pic shows how this year's round count compares to all the other Legion matches over the years. Keep in mind a basic Army load is SEVEN 30 rd rifle magazines (and a "double basic load" is 14!) - so while our round counts are a little higher than others, it's well under even a basic load.

I'm really excited for everyone to see the stages this year. We have a very balanced match with several unique challenges, all based around remembering fallen 5th Special Forces Soldiers. I hope you're ready!

 

kotengu

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Stage 5 (5k) or 7 (10k): MSG Kelly L. Hornbeck

In this stage: Crawl to your hide position in South America. Engage guerillas from the hide. (18B – Weapons SGT)



Special Forces Soldier killed in Iraq

While in South America fighting drug dealers for the U.S. military, Master Sgt. Kelly L. Hornbeck flew a Texas flag over his camp. When asked by a friend, retired Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph Callahan, why the banner was chosen, Hornbeck replied: "When those guerrillas attack, I want them to know there's a Texan here."

Hornbeck, 36, was wounded Jan. 16, 2004, when an explosive device hit his vehicle near Samarraon, Iraq. The soldier, who was stationed at Fort Carson, Colo., died two days later. Born in Selma, Ala., Hornbeck graduated high school in 1985 in Fort Worth, and left Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas, after a year to join the military. "Dad was a great friend," one of Hornbeck's daughters, 11-year-old Jacqueline McCall, said at her father's funeral. "He died for his country and he was the best soldier because he was brave." Master Sgt. Kelly L. Hornbeck sent signals to his parents when he went on a classified mission. Once, through a vague letter, Hornbeck let them know that he would be out of touch for a while but that they should not worry and that he loved them very much.

"My training is not only limited to that which has been bestowed on me by the mightiest military in the world but also by the greatest set of parents in the world," the 36-year-old Special Forces soldier wrote to his parents, Jeff and Camille Hornbeck of Fort Worth. "I am who I am because ya'll made me that way, and for that I thank you." Kelly Hornbeck's parents learned late last week that their only surviving child had been gravely wounded in Iraq. The Defense Department later reported that an explosive device struck his vehicle on Friday while he was on patrol with his unit south of Samarra. He died two days later at a hospital in Baghdad. On Wednesday, his parents spoke about his life, their loss and their love of country. "He was doing a job he was called to do," Camille Hornbeck said during a news conference in the front yard of their southwest Fort Worth home. "We just want to celebrate Kelly's life as a hero and to let the world know he is a special young man."

Kelly was buried with full military honors. He leaves behind two daughters, Jacqueline McCall, 10, of Frederick, Md., and Tyler Rae Hornbeck, 7, of Lumber Bridge, N.C.

Hornbeck graduated from Paschal in 1985. He attended Tarleton State University for one year, playing on the college's football team, before enlisting in the Army in 1987. At first he trained as an infantryman, but he was eventually promoted to drill sergeant. He volunteered for duty with the Special Forces in 1990 and served as a combat diver, a free-fall parachutist and a jump master. It was a dangerous way to make a living, his parents said. "You knew you had to function, so you put it in another place," Jeff Hornbeck said about his knowledge of the perils his son faced daily. "There was a lot of denial that something may happen. "They were always where the pot was bubbling," he added.

In recent years, Kelly Hornbeck did one tour of duty in Afghanistan and was serving his second tour in Iraq when he was killed. His friends said he didn't talk much about his work during visits home.

Here is an undated letter from Kelly Hornbeck to his parents:

Dear Mom and Dad:

If ya'll are reading this, then I am on my way to help do my part to ensure the future security of our great nation. I don't take this charge lightly or with a cavalier attitude, rather with a resolute heart and a clear conscience. I am strongly convinced that what we are doing is just and worthy of all that could be spent in the effort. I am not afraid and neither should either of you be, for I trust in my God (Psalm 23) and my training, two powerful forces that cannot be fully measured.

My training is not only limited to that which has been bestowed on me by the mightiest military in the world but also by the greatest set of parents in the world. I am who I am because ya'll made me that way, and for that I thank you.

If anything untoward should befall me please insure that the qualities you raised me with get passed onto my children. I love you both very much and intend to see you soon!-
 

rowjimmy

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The post everyone has been waiting for: HIT COUNT!

The MINIMUM required hits are as follows:

5k: 50 rifle and 60 pistol
10k: 80 rifle and 60 pistol

The shooting at Legion is always difficult, so I highly suggest NOT skimping on the ammo you carry so you don't run out. I personally will carry 180 rds rifle and 126 rds pistol for the 10k when I run it - and I know exactly what is coming.

Night matches will use the 5k hit count as the MAXIMUM. Ellis may simplify some of the stages once he sees them on the ground if he feels it's necessary - so you MIGHT shoot a little less at night, but you will definitely not shoot more.

And just because I'm a nerd, the pic shows how this year's round count compares to all the other Legion matches over the years. Keep in mind a basic Army load is SEVEN 30 rd rifle magazines (and a "double basic load" is 14!) - so while our round counts are a little higher than others, it's well under even a basic load.

I'm really excited for everyone to see the stages this year. We have a very balanced match with several unique challenges, all based around remembering fallen 5th Special Forces Soldiers. I hope you're ready!

Don't fall for Kotengu's suggested round count men, he's just trying to weigh you down so you can't run as fast. And don't carry any water either, it's 2 lb/liter of extra weight.

No charge for the tips. You gotta watch these gamers!
 

tac-40

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You've been in the north (or a science teacher!) too long - it's 8lb/gallon!

Liters. Pshaw...and mixings lbs and liters?!?! I should revoke your science card. ;-)
Says the guy who loved to shoot .762 cm rifles. :eek: :ROFLMAO: :devilish:

Are you going to let the RO's know what stage they will be working before the match? Just trying to find out what accessories I will need for where you have me working.
 

kotengu

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I am excited to announce Tomahawk Strategic Solutions (https://tomahawkstrategicsolutions.com/) has signed on as a Stage Sponsor.

Tomahawk personnel include Special Operations Forces (SOF) operators, corporate security experts, SWAT/ESU/Patrol officers (retired and active) hand-selected for their specialized skills and experience, and medical professionals.

Tomahawk Strategic Solutions has a proven track record working with a multitude of organizations to improve their security needs. Our experience stretches across a wide spectrum of industries, including law enforcement, healthcare, education, finance, and private security. We are passionate about our work and dedicated to helping our clients achieve their goals.




Media
 

rowjimmy

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You've been in the north (or a science teacher!) too long - it's 8lb/gallon!

Liters. Pshaw...and mixings lbs and liters?!?! I should revoke your science card. ;-)
OK, 2 lb/quart, 1 kg/liter... happy now? I was trying to make it accessible for the Marines,...
 

kotengu

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Stage 1 (10k Only): SFC Robert H. Deeks, Jr.

In this stage: Treat injuries in the vehicle to stabilize your teammates. Exit the vehicle and assault the multi-story building in Somalia to clear the area. (18D – Medical SGT)



True Hero

Sgt. First Class Robert Deeks was attached to the 562 Green Beret unit as a combat medic in 1990’s. When Sgt. Deeks and his unit arrived in Somalia they were assigned to patrol the Somalia’s disputed border with Ethiopia. The two countries had fought a savage, decade-long war and had only a line in the sand border to show for the bloodshed. On March 3, 1993 Sgt. Deeks was driving one of his team’s soft-top Humvees, following behind another vehicle. His left wheel drove right over a buried land mine, so his body took the full force of the blast. When his teammates saw his bloody, mangled body they thought he was dead, so they began giving first aid to the other wound men, one whom had his back broken in the blast. Sgt. Deeks had been the team’s only medic so the others treated the wounded to the best of their training.

As the men worked quickly to stabilize the wounded, one of them saw Deeks move. His face was covered in blood. The land mine had ripped his legs off and he lost one hand and an eye. But Sgt. Deeks was able to regain consciousness and began to instruct his follow soldiers on what first aid to give to the other wounded and him. He was a medic and his job was to save lives at all cost. The team frantically tried to contract Beledweyne, where the medical evacuation unit of the Canadian airborne was located. But their main radio was in Sgt. Deeks Humvee and was destroyed in the blast. But they finally got the backup radio working. After an hour and a half the helicopter arrived. As it lifted off with Deeks in the bay, he lost consciousness. He done all he could do for his teammates. He died as the copter landed about thirty minutes later.

No U.S. Army Special Forces soldier talks about Somalia with out mentioning Bobby Deeks. The Special Forces language lab located in Fort Campbell is named after him. And Fort Campbell’s simple memorial park where a tree is planted for each Special Forces soldier who has died in action or on a training exercise, there is a tree with a plaque for Bobby Deeks.
 
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kotengu

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Big WIN in the sponsorship field last week: It's pretty small in an overall dollar thing, but Hoist is signing on and providing 300 bottles (1 for every competitor) of their product, This is HUGE because I've been trying for years to get a non-shooting related company as a sponsor (SF owned beer/liquor doesn't count!) , but they all back away when they find out guns are involved. Not Hoist.

Full disclosure: I've never tried it. I learned about it because they sponsor a crazy Navy SEAL/ultrarunner podcast I listen to. The basics look very good though:

- 3x the electrolytes of traditional sports drinks
- ½ the sugar of traditional sports drinks
- No high-fructose corn syrup
- No artificial preservatives, sweeteners or dyes
- BPA free
- Kosher
- Made in the USA
- 6 delicious flavors

Find out more at https://drinkhoist.com/

 

kotengu

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The full Rules & Procedures will be emailed to all competitors one week before match day, but to hit some important highlights:

Shooters will be disqualified (DQ’d) and not allowed to finish the course for the following violations: having a loaded rifle anywhere EXCEPT on a shooting stage after the “beep”, dropping a loaded pistol, pointing a loaded weapon at someone, or having a Negligent Discharge (ND). It is solely the judgement of my Staff that I trust if these should occur, and if you argue with an RO you will lose.

Participants will receive both a score for their run based on how long it took them to complete the course, and a score for their shooting based on how long it took them to clear each course of fire. The run score and shooting score will be equally weighted in determining the participant’s final score. This is true run-what-you-brung field-style shooting. For the most part, if you want to carry it for 5 or 10 clicks, be our guest.

Any questions? Any warnings/advice for newbies from people who have been here before?

 

tac-40

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Understand that this is not a place for gaming a shooting stage. While there may be several ways to successfully complete the courses of fire, none of them will be better than another. The designers habitually push the shooter to multi-task, which is what happened in the real life scenarios they are based upon. Expect the unexpected. Practice shooting under stress and in non-typical positions. Practice shooting and moving with one limb handicapped or disabled. Bring lots of water for hydration, a note pad and pen to supplement your memory (both handwriting and memory go in the dumper after the first kilometer), and shooting after doing some wind sprints carrying at least 20+ pounds of gear/weights.
 

kotengu

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Most people have heard good stories about all of the good things SFA does, and many of our group even have personal experiences (which makes them ardent supporters). But we have a lot of new people as well, and some ask questions about how SFA Chpt 38 spends the money we donate from the match - which is perfectly reasonable in this age of shysters and crooks. So here are some facts to help you feel better about your donations and support:



The Special Forces Association, Chpt 38, is a 501(c) nonprofit organization with ZERO administration costs. 100% of the money donated goes through six different accounts to fund things that support SFA’s mission:

PF (Preservation of the Force and Family): This fund is used to support many family/FRG (Family Readiness Groups) programs in the unit I.e. FRG events, hail and farewells, retirement ceremonies, new comers briefs and other family oriented events.

Immediate Needs: This fund is for Soldiers and their families as well as Legion veteran’s emergency needs. Some examples are: death in the family, unexpected expenses to Soldiers like car repairs and is their only vehicle available, newborn ICU emergencies, and we support the Soldier with gas money to commute to Nashville hospital, if a Soldier/veteran’s house burns down so we put them in a hotel until insurance takes over etc.

Child Care: This fund supports Childcare needs for soldiers in different modes: Unit Formals, FRG briefings, New comers brief etc.

Gold Star: Any needs our Gold Star families have. Also we provide support for our annual Gold Star ceremony.

Catástrofe: When we have multiple casualties or any catastrophic event that affects multiple Soldiers/Vets

Casualty Fund: When we have injured Soldiers or a single casualty and the family needs some type of financial support.

By all means, look into it further starting here: https://sfa38.org/

And if we have anyone here who has had a personal experience with SFA and is willing to share - please don't hesitate to do so!
 

rowjimmy

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Question... what frequency will comms be monitored on for the 10k and will the orienteering part where you're given a bearing and distance just be for part of the 10 k course, like between two stages?

If this is verboten to answer, no worries, I'm just tickled I got in.
 
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