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2022 Legion Memorial Run N Gun: Sept 10-11, Spencer, TN

kotengu

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Stage 2 (10k Only): SGT Dustin M. Adkins

In this stage: React to the helicopter crash in the water near Baghdad, Iraq. Fight from the helicopter to land to clear the area. (GSB)

[My own personal note: We included this one on purpose because many times the Support folks don't get the recognition they deserve when we focus on the ODA Teams. This guy was a dentist. And died in a helicopter crash in a lake in Iraq. No one is immune.]



A Defense Department press release said Sticklen and Maj. Joseph T. McCloud, 39, of Grosse Pointe Park, Mich., were killed Sunday when the CH-46 helicopter they were in went down in Anbar province west of Baghdad. Earlier this week, the military identified the other servicemen killed as Air Force Capt. Kermit Evans of Hollandale, Miss., and Army Spc. Dustin M. Adkins of Finger, Tenn.

The Sea Knight helicopter they were in suffered "a power malfunction," according to the military, and landed on Lake Qadisiyah. There were 16 service members aboard.

Out of fears the aircraft would tip or sink, most of them were evacuated out the back of the chopper when it touched down. Four drowned, according to military reports. The pilots managed to "surf-glide" the helicopter across the lake and up a boat ramp, a military spokesman said.

One Marine was pulled from the water - it's unclear if it was Sticklen or McCloud - but attempts to resuscitate him were unsuccessful, the military said. Three service members were found after a search. Twelve others survived. Military officials said the cause of the power failure remains under investigation.

https://www.pilotonline.com/military/article_57e53572-0cf4-5301-a6d0-2901302a4bb5.html
 

kotengu

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Question... what frequency will comms be monitored on for the 10k and will the orienteering part where you're given a bearing and distance just be for part of the 10 k course, like between two stages?

If this is verboten to answer, no worries, I'm just tickled I got in.
Staff will have a separate frequency that will not be given out to the unwashed masses (ha!). And there will be a couple other frequencies used on particular stages for other things.

If you get hopelessly lost in the orienteering part, my general advise is to head due east and you will eventually hit the highway. :)

If you get injured on the course you have several options:
  • Try to get to the closest stage (it may be behind you) and have staff radio for help
  • Stay where you are and have the next competitor either help you to the next stage or run ahead (or back) and notify staff you need help depending on the severity
  • Call on your radio on the enemy frequency. Staff won’t be monitoring this, but many competitors should be. Tell them where you are and what you need. If you’re listening and you hear a call for help – respond. This is not a trick and the enemy transmissions will be more straightforward than this.
I will NOT be giving out the enemy radio frequency until the morning of match day. You have to know how to program a frequency in the 70cm ham band on the fly.
 

rowjimmy

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...
I will NOT be giving out the enemy radio frequency until the morning of match day. You have to know how to program a frequency in the 70cm ham band on the fly.
Frequency is measured in Hz, not cm...:p This was what I needed to know. I need to work with the radio this weekend. I've been too busy with work to play around with the manual and functions.

I'm not worried about the orienteering part and getting lost, per se. I have the map from last year. Unless the poles shift, I'm fairly confident I can follow a bearing and be reasonably close in pacing a distance. But we shall see! Always an adventure, and the rowjimmy fuck-up factor to consider.

And "due East" would cause me to miss the stages in the woods! Don't wanna do that!

Thanks Kotengu!

I thought I get a medivac if I'm injured on the course... how unrealistic... :ROFLMAO:

Seriously, thank you for this labor of love. I mean it bro.
 

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The best place to learn all the details about this year's match is on the Facebook Event Page at https://www.facebook.com/events/2216998515118725 - but I totally get that we have several people who (rightly) hate Facebook, so I'll repost what I think are the important points here for non-FBers. Don't be shy if you have questions or if I've left anything out.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Intro:

The 2022 Legion Memorial Run N Gun is a centerfire biathlon – competitors will complete a 5k-ish (day, night with NVGs, or night with white light) or 10k-ish (day only) run combined with a shooting competition. The event is a test of man and equipment alike. It is intended to give participants an idea of how being hot, cold, exhausted, and challenged by the environment affects their shooting, and to test the effectiveness of their gear under field conditions. This event is not intended for inexperienced shooters – all participants are expected to be familiar with the operation of their firearms, and to observe basic principles of firearm safety at all times. With the exception of emergencies, Range Officers (ROs) are not allowed to help participants in any way. Good attitudes are a must. If you are the type of person who gets upset when minor changes are made to a plan or when you don’t always get your way, this is not the event for you.

Basics:

Participants will receive both a score for their run based on how long it took them to complete the course, and a score for their shooting based on how long it took them to clear each course of fire. The run score and shooting score will be equally weighted in determining the participant’s final score. This is true run-what-you-brung field-style shooting. For the most part, if you want to carry it for 5 or 10 clicks, be our guest.

There are three equipment classes to reflect the different ways Green Berets fight: “Lightfighter” in which you can carry whatever you want, but are limited to one pistol and one rifle; “Operator” in which you must wear body armor with rifle-rated plates installed (front and back at a minimum), and are still limited to one pistol and rifle; and “Tier One” in which you must FINISH the race with a pack weighing at least 45 lbs (not including your main rifle and pistol) – but that pack may (and should) contain ANYTHING that can give you an advantage. The only limit is that pistol targets must be engaged with pistol rounds, and rifle targets must be engaged with rifle rounds. Want to carry a PCC? Be our guest. Think a scoped bolt gun or different upper in 6.5 Creedmore will give you an advantage? Go for it. You can even carry a shotgun to engage steel pistol targets if you want (birdshot only). Any weapons carried must be IN ADDITION to a primary rifle and pistol, and weight of the pack must be stand-alone (a plate carrier would not be included or required, for example). Packs may be removed prior to shooting, as that is how 5th Group would generally do it as well – but this will be done on your run time and BEFORE any wait time starts. Night matches will have only ONE "anything goes" division.

Shooters are expected to have all their firearms sighted in and all their gear ready to go on the morning of the shoot. There will be no zeroing at the event. Think of this as a test of how you and your equipment would perform in a Second Amendment situation if you had to go take care of business at your current state of readiness, whatever that is. Run order will be more or less random. We will try to be accommodating to participants who wish to share firearms or equipment (we can have one person run in the morning and the other in the afternoon), or to partners who wish to run together. Due to issues with back-ups and large groups in the past, only two runners can start together.

Equipment:

The only equipment that is strictly required to participate is a safe center fire rifle, a safe center fire pistol, enough ammo to clear the course (at least twice the minimum required hit count is recommended), eye protection, ear protection, and some form of stopwatch. Rifle targets must be engaged with rifle rounds (no larger than 30-06), and pistol targets must be engaged with pistol rounds. In everything but the “Tier One” class, competitors must carry one rifle and one pistol. Everything else is up to the participant. Shooters may use any type of gear they want to carry their equipment with, the only requirement being that pistols must be carried in a secure holster that covers the trigger if they are to be carried loaded. Rifles may be carried any way you like, as long as they remain pointed in a safe direction. You may not use tracers or armor piercing bullets that have a hardened penetrator core, as we will be using lots of steel targets that we don’t want to see damaged. To be safe – if your bullet attracts a magnet or has a green tip, leave it at home.

Rules:

First and foremost, all participants will be expected to comply with basic firearms safety at all times. If you demonstrate inability or unwillingness to follow basic firearm safety, you will be asked to leave, with no refund and no apology. Muzzles must be pointed in a safe direction at all times, and fingers must be off the trigger unless the firearm is pointed at a target. Long guns shall only be loaded when a shooter is at a rifle stage, after the RO has given the “fire” command. Shooters may leave their handguns loaded at all times if in a secure holster. However, loaded handguns must remain in that holster unless the shooter has been given the “fire” command on a shooting stage. Some stages will be active, involving moving and shooting. Firearms may remain loaded during movement, but strict muzzle discipline must be maintained.

Shooters will be disqualified (DQ’d) and not allowed to finish the course for the following violations: having a loaded rifle anywhere EXCEPT on a shooting stage after the “beep”, dropping a loaded pistol, pointing a loaded weapon at someone, or having a Negligent Discharge (ND). It is solely the judgement of my Staff that I trust if these should occur, and if you argue with an RO you will lose.

Procedures:

When a shooter approaches a station, he will be required to show the RO an empty mag well and empty chamber on his long gun(s). If another shooter is currently on the stage when he arrives, the one who just arrived will be instructed by the RO to start his stopwatch to keep track of his wait time (this will be subtracted off the participant’s run time when his run score is calculated). It is purely the shooter’s responsibility to keep track of his wait time. The ROs have no responsibility whatsoever to help you do this. Even if an RO offers to help you keep track of your time, you have no one but yourself to blame if this is not done. When the shooter is ready to shoot the stage, the RO will record his wait time if any. The shooter will be given a quick summary of the course of fire. The RO will ask if the shooter understands the course of fire. If the answer is yes, the shooter will be given the “fire” command, at which time he may load his rifle and/or draw his pistol and begin shooting the stage. All stages will have a zone where the shooter must fire from -- either a particular hole in a barricade that you must shoot through, or a marked zone on the ground, in which every part of your body or equipment which touches the ground must remain inside of when you fire. Hits made from outside the designated area will not count toward completion of the course of fire. Every shooting stage will have a 3 minute time limit. This is to keep the runners moving and to prevent large backups of shooters waiting to shoot a stage. At the end of that 3 minute period, the shooter will be stopped and time penalties applied to their score for any target not fully neutralized as per the course of fire requirements. If for any reason the “cease fire” command is given, you will immediately cease fire, holster your handgun, and unload your rifle. You will do likewise when you complete a stage, or time out. The RO should tell you your time for the stage. The RO will record your time on their iPad. You may want to carry a pen and notepad to keep track of your score in there is a mix-up with the scoring. Every shooter must show the RO an empty mag well and chamber on his rifle before leaving each stage. The RO will give directions on where to go to continue down the trail. Shooters are NOT required to leave their rifle’s bolt open during the run… this is actually discouraged, as it will allow lots of that beautiful Tennessee red clay to accumulate inside the action. There will be ample opportunity for this to happen on the course.

The Run:

The path for participants to follow will be marked with brightly colored flags and/or tape. Shooters must stay close to the marked path. Do not cut corners. Failure to follow the marked trail may take you into the impact area of a hot range!!! If the trail takes you through some difficult terrain, this is on purpose! Parts of the trail may be down a road. Keep to the left edge of the road and watch for traffic.

Your Fitness:

This event is in a remote area, and you need to be aware of over-exertion. We should have some folks with medical skills on hand, but your health is your responsibility. If you start having problems, slow down... drink some water... listen to your body! There is no shame in walking the course; know yourself and your limitations.

Accommodations:

Dead Zero Shooting Park is in a remote area south of Spencer, TN, so lodging may be challenging. Primitive camping will be allowed on-site for $10/night. Call Dead Zero at 423-800-7758 to make a reservation to camp. A Hotel/Lodge, Cabins and campgrounds with full hookups are available at Fall Creek Falls State Park about 15 miles away, but the Mountaineer Folk Festival is being held there this weekend so most of these sites are booked well in advance. The city of Dunlap is less than 20 miles to the south and has a couple hotels, restaurants, and a Walmart. The cities of Chattanooga and Cookeville are within about 40 miles and have all sorts of nicer options for food and lodging.

There will be people on site all day Friday, as the ROs will be running the course. Registration for the day matches open at 6:30 a.m. and closes at 7:30 a.m on the morning of the match. The safety briefing begins at 7:30 a.m. Anyone who does not get signed in by 7:30 will not be allowed to participate, so be on time. The first runner will be sent out at 8:00 a.m., and another runner will be sent out in a uniform interval thereafter. The ROs will have run the course the day before. They will be scored along with all the other contestants. After the last runner has crossed the finish line, we will calculate the results. The winners will be announced, and trophies and prizes will be awarded as 5th Group sees fit. Night matches will be similarly run with a start time TBD.

How to Sign Up:

The registration fee for the Legion 9/11 Memorial Run N Gun is $120 for the 5k (night or day) and $170 for the 10k. Registration will be limited in number so all runners can finish the course before dark. Registration will be handled through Practiscore, Dead Zero will have you sign a waiver the morning of the match, and we will collect full payment (CASH or CHECK ONLY – NO CREDIT/DEBIT CARDS WILL BE ACCEPTED AND THERE IS NO ATM ONSITE - Edit: payment may be online, we're currently investigating this) the morning of the match. Make sure you are familiar with all of our rules and procedures before signing up. All participants must register under their true names. Tickets are non-transferable. Pre-registration is mandatory, and no walk-ons will be allowed on match day as space and time is limited.

Several discounted slots are being held for active-duty 5th Group personnel. If you are 5th Group, please email mstennett@twlakes.net to confirm your status and claim your reduced competitor slot.

All proceeds from the match will go the Special Forces Association, Chapter 38. Learn more about them here: http://sfa38.org/

Cancellation Policy:

Please cancel your registration through Practiscore as soon as you know you can’t come. We always have several people on the waitlist, and if you don’t cancel early enough not only can they not get in, but the Special Forces Association won’t max out the contribution we can make to them. DON’T BE THAT GUY who just decides not to show up and doesn’t tell anyone.

Directions:

The start and finish line are both located near the Pro Shop at Dead Zero Shooting Park, 1195 TN-111 Scenic, Spencer, TN 38585. Chattanooga, TN has a small airport and is less than an hour’s drive from Dead Zero. Nashville International Airport is a little under two hours’ drive.

Pictures, as always, by Lisa Stennett
Wish I was 20 again...
:(
 

tac-40

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Wish I was 20 again...
:(
There are several of us who have competed well into our 60's. I will be 70 soon and I have finally reached the point where my body is rejecting every attempt to continue on in these competitions. You do not have to run the course, you only have to show up and finish to receive the accolades of the others. Hell, just showing up and trying is better than staying at home. While this particular match is not at a beginner's level, there are others all around that will allow you to try, perform, compete and finish as you progress in your fitness level. Several of the competitors of the RNG's have undergone lifestyle changes for the better after their first match. I've dropped 80+ pounds over the years I have competed and am in a much better place than I was because of this sport.
 

tac-40

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Not trying to shame anybody, but just show some of the other members here who might be on the fence that being "old" is just a thing. Get over it.

Tbd, I'm working the 10 K stage 3 and will be a Go-Fer on Saturday. Look me up and we'll chat if Matt lets me have the time.
 

kotengu

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Stage 3 (10k Only): MSG Robert W. Pittman Jr.

In this stage: Defend the Canal. (18C – Engineer SGT)



Honoring A Hero
https://www.gwcommonwealth.com/news-top-stories/honoring-hero#sthash.71i0pAOg.dpbs

“‘Hero’ is not a word I use lightly, and Robert was a hero,” said Maj. Dave Groves, who knew Pittman while serving in Afghanistan in 2010. “Robert was an absolute consummate professional. If there was a mission to go on, if there was something hard to do, Robert was the first person to volunteer. He was always leading that charge.”

At 41 years old, only a few months after retiring from the Army, Pittman was killed in combat while serving as an Asymmetric Warfare Group consultant in Afghanistan in 2010.

Pittman was a 1986 graduate of Greenwood High School and attended Mississippi Delta Junior College. He was the older of two children; his younger sister is named Allison. His mother and father said Pittman had always wanted to join the Army. Before he turned 21, his parents would not sign the release form for him to enlist. “We kept trying to talk him into finishing college, because he was so smart,” said Wayne. In January 1990, Pittman enlisted in the Army.

When asked what motivated Pittman to join the Army, Vicki said “John Wayne. I think he watched too many John Wayne movies.” Wayne said his son did not like the idea of working inside a building or office all day to make a living. “He wanted to be outside,” he said. “That was the reason the Army was so attractive to him. He could be outside and do all the stuff that you do in the Army.”

Not only did Pittman like being outside, but he had a passion for his work.

After completing basic training and Airborne school, he completed Ranger school and served in the 6th Ranger Training Battalion at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. He was then assigned to the 187th Infantry Regiment at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, where he served as an infantryman, team leader, squad leader and scout squad leader. In August 1996, Pittman attended the Special Forces engineer course, where upon completion he was assigned to the 5th Special Forces Group in Fort Campbell in 1997.

With the exception of a two-year assignment with the 1st Special Warfare Training Group at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Pittman spent the remainder of his 20-year Army career with the 5th Special Forces Group. While assigned to the 5th Special Forces, he served as a Special Forces engineer sergeant, sniper team leader, senior instructor for Phase II of the Special Forces qualification course, Special Forces operations sergeant and troop sergeant major. He retired in April 2010.

Pittman had a distinguished military career, receiving numerous awards, decorations and badges. One of his awards was the Bronze Star Medal with the “V” device to denote heroism. It is the fourth highest military decoration for valor. “Robert called and said I had to get a copy of USA Today,” said Vicki. The date he said she needed to get was a few days old. “I was on a mission,” she said. “I called every motel, everybody I could think of, and finally found a place that still had copies. I accomplished my mission. I think I got all that they had.”

USA Today’s Oct. 20, 2003, front page featured a story about Master Sgt. Tony Pryor, who earned the Silver Star and who was Pittman’s commander. Pittman, although unnamed in the article, is mentioned: “... seven Green Berets in the unit received Bronze Stars for valor in that fight.” He was part of a team of 26 Special Forces soldiers who raided an al-Qaeda compound in the mountains north of Kandahar the year before.

Because Pittman was part of the Special Forces, his parents did not know many of the details of their son’s missions. But they were “super proud” of him, Vicki said. They did, however, find out more information after Pittman passed away. “After we learned more of what he did, my heart was just filled with pride,” said Vicki. “It was just bursting to know that he did all of that.” “In the military, Robert was always out front,” said Wayne. “Many times, if he heard shots fired, he’d run to the shots being fired.”

Pittman began working with Asymmetric Warfare Group, an Army unit headquartered in Fort Meade, after he retired from the Army. “He formed his own company, Southern Eagle Consultant LLC, and he did contract work, and he was actually working for AWG as a consultant,” said Wayne.

At the time of his death, Pittman was serving as an adviser to Lt. Col. David Flynn’s battalion in Afghanistan. The Battle of Bakersfield, including information about Pittman’s death on July 30, 2010, is included in two books — “All In: The Education of General David Petraeus” by Paula Broadwell and Lt. Gen. Daniel Bolger’s “Why We Lost.” Three died that day, and 12 were wounded.
Bolger’s book features Pittman advising soldiers during his time as a contractor. His advice taught small units in contact to maneuver rapidly and not in the ways the Taliban anticipated. “Pittman argued for always seeking the harder path, not taking the obvious, inviting trail, which was invariably filled with IEDs.”

Buried in Arlington, Virginia, Pittman, who lived in Clarksville, Tennessee, was survived by a wife, Melissa, and two daughters — Loren, who is now 26, and Robbie, who is now 21.

“He did what he loved — being out on the field with soldiers, advising and assisting them,” said Groves. “Robert represented more than any of us who serve in this uniform could hope to represent, in my opinion.”
 

kotengu

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Be sure you have eye and ear protection. Yes, it sucks to run in glasses and plugs/muffs. Either deal with it, or take the extra time to put them on before you arrive at a stage. If you show up at a stage without either, you will not be allowed to shoot.

Other things you probably want to have too:

1. Stopwatch to log your wait time (ROs will NOT do it for you)
2. Compass to plot your course through an unmarked section of trail (not mandatory - but will get you a shorter course)
3. Radio to listen in on enemy transmissions (not mandatory, but will help you if you can listen to the 70cm ham band)
 

kotengu

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We have a lot of new challenges this year, but I haven't yet told you about the heaviest weight I'll ever ask you to carry:

SFA has provided us a dog tag for every fallen soldier in 5th Group History. Pick one up before you go on your run, and carry that soldier with you on the course. Draw strength from his memory, and when you feel like quitting or slowing down think of how insignificant your struggles are compared to all he and his family went through. Honor him with your performance and perseverance.

Hang that dog tag in a place of honor after you cross the finish line, then go home and learn about that soldier who went with you on the course. Tell your family and friends about him, and remember him well.

Military gets first pick of the dog tags, but civilians CAN and SHOULD take part in this too. DON'T YOU DARE leave one single dog tag uncarried - no one gets left behind.

 

kotengu

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I thought I get a medivac if I'm injured on the course... how unrealistic... :ROFLMAO:
I actually just learned we'll have a wilderness Search & Rescue company onsite all weekend training their folks. They'll be running mock emergency and extraction drills throughout the course, and will JUMP at the chance to perform a real rescue and extraction.

Sorry - no Nightstalker helicopters though. Yet...
 

rowjimmy

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I actually just learned we'll have a wilderness Search & Rescue company onsite all weekend training their folks. They'll be running mock emergency and extraction drills throughout the course, and will JUMP at the chance to perform a real rescue and extraction.

Sorry - no Nightstalker helicopters though. Yet...
Thanks, I hope to avoid this... but nice to know help is there.
 

kotengu

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Bring plenty of extra cash as always this weekend - we'll have at least one rifle raffle, Ashley Edgcombe's painting raffle, a few different colors of t-shirts for $25 each, a limited number of morale patches for $10 each, and stickers for $5 each.

All to raise more money for the Special Forces Association, Chapter 38. Last year we netted them $20,000. We're on track to net $30,000 this year - but only with your help and generosity!

 

L Haney

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I want one of those patches, soooooooo baaaaaaaaad. $$$$ will be available for it.
And you got one like this for free.

Legion Hat.jpg

Because you stood Stage Three for three days and I know you guys ran a clean stage with no incidents or injuries. Good job Sir.
 
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