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Silver Solder Question

whisky_n_hot_dogs

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Just used up my last bit of jewlers silver solder. Not happy with the thinness of the roll at about 0.025" diameter. The skinniness made it difficult to hold and put to the hot work piece. Melted fine but sometimes lead to extra tail stuck to the workpiece and not getting drawn into the joint.

So the question to any of you soldering/brazing folks is- what thickness should I look at for my next purchase. I want to make holding this manageable but not too thick it makes for difficult melting when touching off.
 

FIANNAFAL

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All ways used Brownells silver paste.
I have done a lot of brazing on aluminum to copper foil. Transformers.
Also sweat pipe some. My first thoughts is metals not hot enough.
Trick is to get both pieces at the same temp as the Sauder, at the same time.
Same goes for electronic sauldering
Clean ,hot, and no mechanical stress on joint till cooled.
 
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FIANNAFAL

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I hav e cherryed barrels and muzzle brakes on old crap barrels for practice.
Kinda related , next step was to cut off MB and re thread barrel. Try agIn.
Never seemed to effect better barrels. Once I got it down.
 

Pluribus

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I prefer silvaloy silver solder in a 3/32 (.093”) of an inch diameter, sometimes.125”. Most thinner diameters such as what you are using, I use a hollow shaft pin vise to hold it for feed. Don’t tighten the collett down all the way so you can simply push the silver wire through as you melt. Borax paste for flux.
923D66C9-8937-424F-BA31-51E64560C81C.jpeg
0E02881C-E068-4B6F-AEBC-894EDE758E1C.jpeg
 

whisky_n_hot_dogs

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I prefer silvaloy silver solder in a 3/32 (.093”) of an inch diameter, sometimes.125”. Most thinner diameters such as what you are using, I use a hollow shaft pin vise to hold it for feed. Don’t tighten the collett down all the way so you can simply push the silver wire through as you melt. Borax paste for flux.
View attachment 231809
View attachment 231811
Ah! Yes it was silvaloy 355 which I had more pleasant time working with. Otherwise I'll pick up a pin vise on your recommendation. Thanks!
 

Pluribus

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Yes, that’s it, Silvaloy 355. Flows really nicely. You’ll appreciate the pin vise as a way to hold it. There are plenty of other ways to hold it somehow but this is more like holding a pencil tip as you’re working. Leave the collet just loose enough it has friction to hold it but you can still just push the silver wire through to feed more.
 

gunplumber

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All depends on what you are soldering, I guess. For gun parts soldering, of which I do a lot, I use Harris Brand Safety Silv 45 and Stay silv flux. The flux does dry out and can be made back into a paste with water, but I buy the small containers anyway and keep them sealed until needed.

The "safety Silv" just means there is no Cadmium, which I guess can cause brain damage after sniffing it for a long time. It is available in a variety of thicknesses.

Last time I bought the Safety Silv 45, it was less expensive to buy three 1 Oz units, than the 3 oz unit.

I use Oxy/Acetylene with a #0 tip.

For muzzle devices, during the ban era, I'd use Brownells silver solder paste (can't recall maker) and MAPP.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005ENPK6W/?tag=akfnfal-20

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0072LEFJM/?tag=akfnfal-20
 

whisky_n_hot_dogs

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All depends on what you are soldering, I guess. For gun parts soldering, of which I do a lot, I use Harris Brand Safety Silv 45 and Stay silv flux. The flux does dry out and can be made back into a paste with water, but I buy the small containers anyway and keep them sealed until needed.

The "safety Silv" just means there is no Cadmium, which I guess can cause brain damage after sniffing it for a long time. It is available in a variety of thicknesses.

Last time I bought the Safety Silv 45, it was less expensive to buy three 1 Oz units, than the 3 oz unit.

I use Oxy/Acetylene with a #0 tip.

For muzzle devices, during the ban era, I'd use Brownells silver solder paste (can't recall maker) and MAPP.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005ENPK6W/?tag=akfnfal-20

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0072LEFJM/?tag=akfnfal-20
So far my brazing projects have been sights, muzzle devices which require higher temp solder.
The project I just finished was a left hand charging handle mod for an AK and used the high temp solder. It took a bit longer just to heat up the parts, but the solder flowed in and made contact between two surfaces on the parts. If there's a suitable solder with high strength but lower temp, I'll have at it. Strength of the joint on this AK mod will be judged when I have to mortar out a jammed case.
 

Nathaniel01

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I need to practice silver soldering. My first gas tube to gas block did not go as well as I would have liked. Not quite straight, and excess solder to clean out of threads.

Can I reheat it and remove it to try again, or should I use a new gas block and gas tube?
 

whisky_n_hot_dogs

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I need to practice silver soldering. My first gas tube to gas block did not go as well as I would have liked. Not quite straight, and excess solder to clean out of threads.

Can I reheat it and remove it to try again, or should I use a new gas block and gas tube?
Got photos?
You can soften the joint with heat and separate the parts but solder is generally difficult to clean out of threads.
Are you soldering two threaded parts together or a threaded gas tube into an unthreaded gas block?
 

Gazz

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Applying silver solder in the wire form can be wasteful and messy. Jewelers typically apply solder in pallion form, or small snippets of wire or sheet. It is important to get both pieces to be joined to the same temperature at the same time otherwise the solder will flow to the hotter piece first. If you do it right, the solder will flow or get sucked into the seam of the pieces you are trying to join. Oxy/acetylene is best as more hotter is more better (to a point). Also a soldering pick is handy and is used to apply the pallions using the flux as a carrier and to push them around and to help direct flow once the stuff is melted. A pick is just a pointed steel rod and can be easily made from a stick welding electrode by grinding it to a point.
 
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